Galerie
Napoléon
- Paris - Collection of the Manuscripts

Manuscript - Henry IV Period (1606) | Portrait of Henry IV of France (Frans Pourbus le Jeune)
Handwritten document (2 pages) on watermarked laid paper written in 1606 (Henry IV)

160617th Century
  • Date : 1606
  • Century : 17th Century
  • Period : Henry IV
  • Passepartout : 65 x 50 cm
  • Inventory N° : FR-02132
450€
(Frame not included)
  • Certificate of authenticity
  • Passepartout included
  • Portfolio exacompta
  • Free shipping costs
  • Shipment within 24H
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Henry IV
(1589-1610)

Title

Manuscript - Henry IV Period (1606) | Portrait of Henry IV of France (Frans Pourbus le Jeune)

Type

Handwritten document (2 pages) on watermarked laid paper written in 1606 (Henry IV)

This historical document is composed of these 2 documents mounted under passepartout :

Ancient Document

Manuscript - Henry IV Period (1606)

Type

  • Handwritten document (2 pages) on watermarked laid paper written in 1606 (Henry IV).
  • Signed and dated.

Illustrated document

Portrait of Henry IV of France (Frans Pourbus le Jeune)

Type

  • High quality, full-colour and full-bleed printing
  • Light white paper, uncoated matte finish with an eggshell texture

Collection of the Manuscripts

Period Henry IV

Henry IV of France, born on 13 December 1553 and died on 14 May 1610, was King of Navarre (as Henry III) from 1572 and King of France from 1589 to 1610. He was the first monarch of France from the House of Bourbon, a cadet branch of the Capetian dynasty.

The son of Antoine de Bourbon, Duke of Vendôme and Jeanne d'Albret, the Queen of Navarre, Henry was baptised as a Catholic but raised in the Protestant faith by his mother.

Although baptized a Catholic, he was brought up in the Protestant religion and was involved in the Wars of Religion as Prince of the Blood, King of Navarre and leader of the Protestant nobility. He abjures Protestantism in 1572, just after his marriage to Marguerite de Valois, to escape the Saint-Barthélemy Massacre, but returns in 1576 after having succeeded in fleeing the French court.

In 1584, on the death of Duke François d'Anjou, younger brother and heir of King Henry III of France, Henri de Navarre became the legitimate heir to the throne. The Catholics of the Holy League refuse to see a Protestant ascend the throne. In 1589, after the assassination of Henri III, he nevertheless became King of France. To reinforce his legitimacy, Henri IV solemnly abjures Protestantism on July 25, 1593 in the Saint-Denis basilica. In 1598, he signed the Edict of Nantes, authorizing Protestant worship according to specific terms, thus putting an end to more than three decades of Wars of Religion.

In December 1599, he obtained the annulment of his marriage with Queen Marguerite, and married, at the Saint-Jean cathedral in Lyon, on December 17, 1600, Marie de Médicis.

The years of peace allow the funds to be bailed out. Henri IV built the large Louvre gallery that connects the palace to the Tuileries. He launched several expansion and decor campaigns in the great royal castles, in Fontainebleau and Saint-Germain-en-Laye, using several talented sculptors and French or Flemish painters. It implements a policy of modern urbanism. He continued the construction of Pont Neuf, which began under his predecessor. He built two new places in Paris, Place Royale and Place Dauphine.

During the reign of Henry IV, rivalry continued among France, the Habsburg in Spain, and the Holy Roman Empire for the mastery of Western Europe. The conflict was not resolved until after the Thirty Years' War.

Henry IV was assassinated in Paris, by a fanatic Catholic, François Ravaillac, on May 14, 1610. He was buried in the Saint-Denis basilica on July 1, 1610, at the end of several weeks of funeral ceremonies. His widow, Marie de Medici, served as regent for their nine-year-old son, Louis XIII, until 1617.

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This option will be offered to you free of charge in the cart.

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